Criminal Justice

Criminal Justice officials play a critical part of any comprehensive plan to address the overdose crisis in the United States. They are on the front lines in many ways: from stopping the diversion and distribution of illicit drugs to interacting with people suffering from substance use disorder at many of the most promising intervention points. Law enforcement officials can intervene and begin the treatment process following observed or suspected drug use without accompanying criminal activity, prior to making an arrest for criminal activity, and many other junctures in the criminal justice system.

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Presentation by Ed Markey, United States Senator for Massachusetts that demands strategic planning that thoughtfully brings together science, medicine, public health and law enforcement in a multi-faceted solution. The foundation of a comprehensive approach must integrate policy changes that focus on prevention, treatment and enforcement.
An Introduction to Synthetic Drugs discusses the history of synthetic substances, where synthetic drugs come from and how they are made, the problem of synthetic drugs and categories of synthetic substances.
Journal of Health Care Law and Policy article Applying Federal Commerce and State Police Powers to Reduce Prescription Drug Abuse
This issue of NAMSDL Case Law Update focuses on several ongoing cases related to the access to and use of prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP/PMP) records. Summarized cases include a recent, appellate-level decision from Washington state regarding the constitutionality of accessing those records.
This issue of NAMSDL Case Law Update focuses on several ongoing cases related to the marketing, distribution and prescribing of controlled substances. Summarized cases include: (1) a lawsuit recently filed against the maker of OxyContin by a city in Washington State; and (2) a federal appellate court decision upholding a doctor’s conviction for Controlled Substances Act violations.
This issue of NAMSDL Case Law Update focuses on several recent court decisions addressing state drunk/drugged driving laws, including decisions issued by the highest courts of Arizona, Maryland, Minnesota, and Washington. The topics addressed in the summarized cases include the constitutionality of warrantless blood or urine tests and Washington state’s specified concentration statute.
This issue of NAMSDL Case Law Update presents summaries of both the Kentucky vs. Purdue Pharma case, which has been resolved, and the State of California vs. Lisa Tseng case, both important cases in the fight against prescription drug abuse. Additionally, NAMSDL continues to follow cases mentioned in previous issues of NAMSDL Case Law Update.
This issue of NAMSDL Case Law Update presents a brief update on the Oregon PMP vs. DEA case that has been pending before the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals since January 2015. It also includes a case involving dependency of children whose parents are medical marijuana users, challenges to the Massachusetts ballot initiative to legalize marijuana in that state, as well as a tribal challenge to a federal law prohibiting cultivation of industrial hemp unless allowed by state law. Additionally, NAMSDL continues to follow cases mentioned in previous issues of NAMSDL Case Law Update.
This issue of the NAMSDL Case Law Update focuses on several recent court decisions and other ongoing cases of note involving marijuana laws and the use of marijuana. The Update includes two recent decisions by U.S. Courts of Appeal and one decision by the Supreme Court of Colorado. Topics addressed in the issue include viewpoint discrimination, the federal appropriations rider concerning marijuana prosecutions, contract enforceability, and federal preemption. Cases are divided by type of court (federal or state) and then listed in approximate descending order of appellate level.
This issue of the NAMSDL Case Law Update focuses on several recent federal and state court decisions involving defendants accused of manufacturing and/or selling novel psychoactive substances. A number of the cases encompass U.S. Courts of Appeal applying the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2015 holding in McFadden v. United States concerning a defendant’s requisite knowledge to support a conviction under the federal Analogue Act. Other cases include intermediate appellate courts in Kansas and Utah addressing challenges to state controlled substance laws. In the Update, cases are divided by type of court (federal or state) and then listed in approximate descending order of appellate level. In addition, state laws and courts differ in their spelling of the word analogue (analog). Each case write-up within this Update contains the spelling used in the respective opinion.

 

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